Sunday Times Books LIVE Community Sign up

Login to Sunday Times Books LIVE

Forgotten password?

Forgotten your password?

Enter your username or email address and we'll send you reset instructions

Sunday Times Books LIVE

Pan Macmillan

@ Sunday Times Books LIVE

Archive for the ‘Video’ Category

What If There Were No Whites In South Africa? Ferial Haffajee Explains the Title of Her New Book

What If There Were No Whites In South Africa?A few months ago, Ferial Haffajee chatted to Ruda Landman about her new book, What If There Were No Whites In South Africa?, which is now on the shelves.

The provocatively titled book is the respected journalist’s debut, and she explains to Landman where the title comes from.

“I’ve come to a point in my life where I want to think a little more deeply about what we’re going to be as a nation and where we’re going,” Haffajee says, “to answer those questions, because I get asked them a lot, and make myself part of the voice of those voices, saying, ‘here’s our scenarios, here’s what we could do’.”

“So, if Van Riebeeck didn’t come?” Landman asks.

“Then what would have happened? Not really,” Haffajee says. “But even now, I think it is a debate in our society, which believes falsely that only if we had all the stuff whites have got, then everything would be cool. But actually that’s not true. And it’s often a debate formed on very wonky foundations, and I recognise it will be a difficult book to write, but I feel like the time is right for it.”

Haffajee says the basis of the book is not opinion but research, with the aim of showing how much situations around property, pension, provident fund ownership have changed.

Watch the video:

YouTube Preview Image

Book details


» read article

Moeletsi Mbeki Predicted an “Arab Spring” Youth Uprising in South Africa – Back in April (Video)

Advocates for ChangeArchitects of PovertyIn an interview earlier this year Moeletsi Mbeki, economist and editor of Advocates for Change: How to Overcome Africa’s Challenges, predicted the student protests that have shaken up South Africa for the past month.

Mbeki, who was interviewed by Trust Matsilele for CNBC Africa, characterised South Africa as “a bomb waiting to explode, all it needs is a little match to spark it and it will go up in flames”. He said that the country was moving towards an “Arab Spring” type uprising because of the shortage of opportunities and useful employment, particularly for the youth.

Mbeki also commented that military reactions against protesters are fruitless; only employment will curb young people’s restless frustration.

Watch the video:

 

Book details


» read article

13 Years Clean and On the Way to a Comrades Silver: Kabelo Mabalane Shares His Story (Podcast and Video)

I Ran For My LifeKabelo Mabalane, TKZee star who has just released his biography I Ran For My Life: My Story, was recently invited to The Complimentary Breakfast radio show on Jacaranda FM to speak about his story.

For the first part of the interview, host Rian van Heerden spoke with Mabalane while they were both on treadmills. Mabalane, who has completed the Comrades Marathon eight times and is hoping for a silver medal next year, was hardly short of breath. Van Heerden, in contrast, was in great need of the emergency stop button by the end of the chat.

Watch the video:

YouTube Preview Image

 
Mabalane told Van Heerden why “Vida la Vida” by Coldplay is one of the best songs on his running playlist, and shared what it felt like to cross the finish line of the Comrades the first time:

 

 
In an different interview with Ntombizodwa Makhoba for City Press, Mabalane spoke about his being “13 years clean”. His message to other addicts is “There is help, hope, and it is possible.”

YouTube Preview Image

 
Also read:

 

Book details


» read article

Achmat Dangor “Perversely” Thanks the Apartheid Government for His SALA Lifetime Achievement Award

Strange PilgrimagesThis month, the 2015 South African Literary Awards will present Achmat Dangor with a Lifetime Achievement Literary Award.

The legendary activist, whose most recent book is Strange Pilgrimages, spoke to Morning Live presenter Samm Marshall about his literary life and what being nominated for the SALAs means to him.

Reflecting on where it all started, Dangor said the apartheid banning order that prohibited him from publishing any books or preparing any manuscripts for publication gave him the time to focus on writing.

“In many ways, perversely almost, I need to thank the South African government, the old apartheid government,” he says. “In 1973, I was part of the Black Consciousness Movement, the student movement, and I was banned for five years.

“But my spare time I devoted to my writing because I had nothing else to do.

“Every time I wrote a manuscript, in those days yes it was pen to paper, I’d even hide it. I had manuscripts in my ceiling, in friends’ ceilings, in the garden.”

Dangor was also part of a literary group called Black Thoughts that went around to schools reading banned literature to students.

Watch the video:

YouTube Preview Image

 
The SALA ceremony will be held at the Tshwane Events Centre on 7 November, 2015:

 

Book details


» read article

We Need a Culture of Consequence – Onkgopotse JJ Tabane on Why He Wrote Let’s Talk Frankly

Let's Talk FranklyPolity’s Samantha Herbst recently interviewed Onkgopotse JJ Tabane about his book, Let’s Talk Frankly: Letters to Influential South Africans About the State of Our Nation.

Tabane says there are two main reasons why he wrote the book: The issue of accountability and the culture of acquiescence and silence.

“This is only the first book, there will be many others before I die,” Tabane quips, explaining that we need a culture of consequence. “The issue is that there is no sense of consequence in dealing with corruption.”

Watch the video:

YouTube Preview Image

Book details


» read article

Kabelo Mabalane: The Hardest Part of Writing I Ran For My Life Was Reliving the Past (Video)

I Ran For My LifeI Ran For My Life: My Story by Kabelo Mabalane, co-written with Nechama Brodie, tells the remarkable story of how the TKZee kwaito star battled with drugs and won.

Mabalane was not alone in the battle. At the launch of his book at Exclusive Books Rosebank earlier this month, Mabalane told Eusebius McKaiser that the drugs left a dark void he needed to fill, and running became his substitute high. Not only is he today a 10-time SAMA award-winner, TV presenter, athlete and entrepreneur, he’s also completed eight Comrades Marathons.

 
Channel24 interviewed Mabalane at the launch of I Ran For My Life. The author said that his story is one of hope, and he hopes it will inspire people who are in the same position.

Watch the video:

YouTube Preview Image

 

Mabalane, who’s been clean and sober for 13 years, said the hardest part of writing the book was “going back to relive this stuff” and “being reminded of how much you were such a loser”. Reflecting on the process, he explains why going back and being vulnerable was important to writing the book.

Watch the video (part 1):

YouTube Preview Image

 

Watch the video (part 2):

YouTube Preview Image

 

Helen Herimbi interviewed Mabalane for Tonight about the life that inspired the book. A big part of I Ran For My Life also deals with Mabalane’s relationship with his father and the traumatic experience of watching him die.

Mabalane’s mother later married Poet Laureate Keorapetse Kgositsile, who told Herimbi at the book launch that he was proud of Mabalane’s courage:

A major thread of the book is family. At the launch, I caught up with his mother, who commented: “I’m happy that we’re laughing about it now. When it happened it wasn’t a laughing matter.”

Although his father has died – which is a heart-wrenching section of the book – Mabalane’s mother remarried South African lauded literature giant, Keorapetse Kgositsile, whom Kabelo referred to as “Papa” at the launch.

I asked Kgositsile what he thought of Mabalane’s book and he said: “Ja, I’ve read the book. I thought it was very courageous on Kabelo’s part to share even the non-flattering aspects of what he’s been through. But at least one could see that it was also guided by a desire for that kind of life to not be repeated.”

Book details


» read article

“The Problem is Bigger than Just Fees” – Frank Chikane Responds to #FeesMustFall and His Son’s Arrest

The Things that Could Not be SaidNo Life of My OwnEight Days in September

Kgotsi Chikane, son of the apartheid activist Rev Frank Chikane, was arrested with five other student protesters outside Parliament on Tuesday.

Chikane, who is the author of The Things that Could Not be Said, No Life of My Own and Eight Days in September: The Removal of Thabo Mbeki, told eNCA he was not surprised at his son’s involvement in the #FeesMustFall protests.

Chikane is concerned for his son’s safety, but was aware of Kgotsi’s leadership position at UCT and supports Kgotsi’s activism.

Watch the video:

YouTube Preview Image

Chikane was interviewed ANN7 at Wits University about the student protests all around South Africa. He says, “The problem is bigger than just fees. The problem is that after 1994, we have not found a solution to deal with the legacy of apartheid. As a result, the poor people remain poor.

“When you talk fees you are talking poverty. The point is, we need a country where every child’s future is not determined by the class of their parents.”

Watch the video:

YouTube Preview Image

 
Also read:

Book details


» read article

“My Mother Won’t Believe This Actually Happened”: Khaya Dlanga at the 2015 Nedbank Talks4Success (Video)

To Quote MyselfKhaya Dlanga, author of To Quote Myself, was one of the “game changers” recently featured in the 2015 edition of Nedbank’s Talks4Success.

Talks4Success is an annual event that aims to “inspire and ignite” young people with a line-up of leaders who are shaking things up in their fields.

Dlanga’s talk has been shared on YouTube in nine parts. With characteristic energy and enthusiasm, he starts off by sending a Snapchat message: “My mother won’t believe this actually happened.”

Dlanga goes on to share the story of his success, and how difficult experiences can be used to create incredible things.

Watch Part 1 of 9:

YouTube Preview Image

Book details


» read article

Frank Talk on the Justice Factor: Onkgopotse JJ Tabane Talks About Let’s Talk Frankly (Video)

Let's Talk FranklyJustice Malala recently invited Onkgopotse JJ Tabane onto the Justice Factor where he spoke about his book, Let’s Talk Frankly: Letters to Influential South Africans About the State of Our Nation.

Malala asks: “Why did you write a book that says, Let’s Talk Frankly? What is it about?” Tabane says the book contains a selection of letters that he wrote to 21 influential South Africans, and an extra letter to “the signal jammer, whoever that is”.

Tabane decided to write the book for two reasons. First, he says, “citizens must get in the habit of getting leaders to account directly”. “If you write a letter to a minister they’re obliged to respond as servants of the people.”

The second reason is to stimulate a culture of debate, of “flourishing, divergent views”, which in Tabane’s opinion has deteriorated since 1994.

“Onkgopotse, I totally disagree with you,” Malala interjects. “You write for the Daily Maverick, I sit here calling people losers of the week.”

“You’re an exception, Justice, that’s the trouble,” Tabane objects.

Malala continues: “So many of us are speaking very eloquently and we are not being stopped.”

“That’s true, but you see it’s the quality of that debate that worries me,” Tabane insists.

Watch the passionate discussion between the two commentators:

 

Book details


» read article

Video: Greg Mills and Jeffrey Herbst Discuss How Employment Opportunity can Create a Better South Africa

How South Africa WorksGreg Mills and Jeffrey Herbst were recently featured on Polity to speak about their new book How South Africa Works: And Must Do Better.

In their interview with Shannon de Ryhove, Mills and Herbst speak about what is needed “if we are going to build the sort of South Africa that we want to”. They suggest the way to do this is to address unemployment.

Mills says that the government has been “enormously successful” at addressing poverty since 1994, but that has been through welfare and redistribution. Pure redistribution is not sustainable in the long run, nor is it ideal because work gives people purpose and a place in society. The book looks to stimulate economic reform that will result in greater employment opportunity in South Africa.

Watch the video:

YouTube Preview Image

Book details


» read article