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Archive for the ‘South Africa’ Category

Cape Town launch: Dare Not Linger by Mandla Langa (28 November)

‘I have discovered the secret that after climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. I have taken a moment here to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can rest only for a moment, for with freedom comes responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not ended.’

NELSON MANDELA, Long Walk to Freedom

In 1994, Nelson Mandela became the first president of a democratic South Africa. From the outset, he was committed to serving only a single five-year term. During his presidency, he and his government ensure that all South Africa’s citizens became equal before the law, and laid the foundations for turning a country riven by centuries of colonialism and apartheid into a fully functioning democracy.

Dare Not Linger is the story of Mandela’s presidential years, drawing heavily on the memoir he began to write as he prepared to finish his term of office but was unable to finish. Now, acclaimed South African writer Mandla Langa has completed the task, using Mandela’s unfinished draft, detailed notes that Mandela made as events were unfolding and a wealth of unseen archive material. With a prologue by Mandela’s widow, Graça Machel, the result is a vivid and often inspirational account of Mandela’s presidency and the creation of a new democracy. It tells the extraordinary story of a country in transition and the challenges Mandela faced as he strove to make his vision for a liberated South Africa a reality.

Nelson Mandela was born in Transkei, South Africa, on 18 July 1918. He joined the African National Congress in 1944 and was engaged in resistance against the ruling National Party’s apartheid policies for many years before being arrested in August 1962. Mandela was incarcerated for more than twenty-seven years, during which his reputation as a potent symbol of resistance to the anti-apartheid movement grew steadily. Released from prison in 1990, Mandela won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993 and was inaugurated as the first democratically elected president of South Africa in 1994. He is the author of the international bestseller Long Walk to Freedom. He died on 5 December 2013, at the age of ninety-five.

Mandla Langa was born in 1950 in Durban, South Africa. After being arrested in 1976, he went into exile and has lived in Botswana, Mozambique and Angola, where he did his Umkhonto weSizwe (the armed wing of the African National Congress) military training, as well as Hungary, Zambia and the United Kingdom, where he was the African National Congress’s cultural representative. A writer and journalist, he was the first South African to be awarded the Arts Council of Great Britain bursary for creative writing, and he has been a columnist for the Sunday Independent and the New Nation. In 2007, he was the recipient of the presidential Order of Ikhamanga in Silver for his literary and journalistic contribution to democracy in South Africa. He is also the author of several acclaimed novels, including The Lost Colours of the Chameleon, which won the 2009 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best Book in the African region.

Graça Machel was born in Gaza, Mozambique, in 1945. She was a member of the Mozambican Liberation Front (FRELIMO) which fought for and won independence from Portugal in 1975. A teacher, human rights activist, international advocate for women’s and children’s rights, and politician, she was – from 1975 until his death in 1986 – married to Samora Machel, the first president of Mozambique. She married Nelson Mandela on his eightieth birthday in July 1998. Among her numerous awards for her humanitarian work, she was a recipient of the United Nations’ Nansen Medal in 1995, and in 2007 she was made an honorary Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire.

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“It’s a sexy, sexy book!” – Eusebius McKaiser and Angela Makholwa discuss The Blessed Girl

When you are accustomed to the finer things in life – designer shoes, champagne, VIP lounges, exotic holidays abroad, a luxury penthouse, expensive wheels – what independent young woman in her right mind would want to let them go? Certainly not the beautiful, ambitious and super-streetsmart Bontle Tau, the girl who has used her good looks and winning charm all her life to get exactly what she wants. The lifestyle doesn’t come cheap, though, nor does maintaining the body that allows it (just ask Dr Heinz at the beauty clinic).

Luckily, Bontle has a degree in MENcology, and there is no shortage of blessers at her penthouse door, eager to give her all the love and (financial) support she needs.

Papa Jeff might be overweight and getting on a bit, and receiving some unwanted attention from the Hawks; and Teddy might not have fully come through for her on that messed-up tender business; but Mr Emmanuel, the Nigerian businessman with deep pockets and the possibility of conferring second wife status … could that be love? Keeping all her boyfriends happy and living a fabulous life is not without its challenges.

With so many people clamouring for Bontle’s attention – from her shebeen queen mother Gladys in Mamelodi, who is taking strain bringing up her teenaged brother, Golokile, on her own; to her girlfriends, Iris and Tsholo; not to mention her soon-to-be ex-husband, the ever-patient, ever-loving Ntokozo, Bontle barely has time to post on Instagram these days.

Sooner or later something’s got to give …

Angela recently was a guest on Eusebius McKaiser’s 702 Literature Corner show. Listen to the juicy conversation:

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Cape Town launch – Bantu Holomisa: The Game Changer by Eric Naki (27 November)

This autobiography looks at Bantu Holomisa and his journey into politics. As a son of a chief nothing less was expected of him than to go to school and get a university education. However he thought taking a gap year and starting a job in the post office would be great experience and make some money before going to university.

The book takes us through some life defining moments which lead to him joining the Defense Force, climbing up the ranks to being a respected Commander of the TDF. Alongside that we learn about the man who is generous and is known for helping his family, finding the love of his life and the family politics of being born to a royal family. Holomisa was a man who led with integrity and that is what carries him to being the Transkei leader. He has always had his own ways and not particularly leaning towards a political party or politics and that is what also leads to him being expelled from the ANC.

His expulsion stems from him wanting to always speak the truth and not letting others influence him otherwise. Due to numerous structures wanting him to still speak on their behalf he goes on to form the United Democratic Movement (UDM), which successfully gets elected into parliament a mere three years after his expulsion. He continues to be a thorn on the ANC’s side as an opposition in parliament.

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David France wins the Baillie Gifford Prize for Non-Fiction for How to Survive a Plague

David France has been awarded the Baillie Gifford Prize for Non-Fiction! The announcement was made on the evening of 16 November.

As per the press release, composed by Picador publisher Ravi Mirchandani:

I am delighted to share the news, to those of you who don’t yet know, that last night our author David France won the Baillie Gifford Prize for Non-Fiction (formerly the Samuel Johnson Prize).

The prize is the UK’s leading award for non-fiction, but it is open to books published in the UK by writers from all over the world, including in translation.

David’s book tells the story of AIDS from the first cases in the US in the late 70s to the emergence of the combination drug therapies that mean that an HIV diagnosis is no longer a death sentence in the 90s. It is in part his own story, as a gay man in New York at the time and as a journalist who covered AIDS, at a time when the mainstream press very largely did not, but it is also a significant work of history.

Thanks to the fact that the virus very disproportionately targeted members of stigmatised groups – gay men, heroin addicts and Haitian immigrants – the American establishment, from President Reagan to the pharmaceutical industry, the medical authorities, the churches and the media, for years turned a blind eye to the increasing number of deaths, usually terrible, drawn-out and agonizingly painful deaths, and to the health crisis that was emerging in plain sight.

Thanks to this willful neglect, 40 million people around the world have died. Many of them need not have.

But the book is also the story of how groups of HIV-positive people across America and the world, many of them literally fighting for their lives, fought one of the most effective protest campaigns in history. And how they eventually won.

Thanks to these activists and to a crucial group of scientists and drug developers, many millions have not died and are ‘living with HIV’, thanks to the combination therapies.Their achievement has changed not only HIV, but also the ways in which medical research is done and made a major contribution to the emergence of the ‘patients’ rights’ movement.

For all these reasons the book is an important one; it is also hugely readable, not only at times almost unbearably moving, but also gripping and inspiring, a story of heroism and victory as well as of sadness and bereavement.

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Pan Macmillan accepting manuscript submissions: 20 – 24 November

Pan Macmillan South Africa unfortunately does not accept unsolicited manuscripts.

We will only be accepting manuscripts during our open submissions period which will be from the 20th to the 24th of November 2017.

Guidelines for submitting your work to Pan Macmillan:
Pan Macmillan South Africa publishes books for the general market in the following categories:

General fiction

Literary fiction

Memoir/biography/autobiography

General non-fiction

Submission guidelines: Pan Macmillan South Africa


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Pan Macmillan accepting manuscript submissions from 20 – 24 November 2017

Pan Macmillan South Africa unfortunately does not accept unsolicited manuscripts.

We will only be accepting manuscripts during our open submissions period which will be from the 20th to the 24th of November 2017.

Guidelines for submitting your work to Pan Macmillan:

Pan Macmillan South Africa publishes books for the general market in the following categories:

General fiction

Literary fiction

Memoir/biography/autobiography

General non-fiction

Submission guidelines: Pan Macmillan South Africa


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“He explores humanity without sacrificing the enticing nature of mystery that many apocalyptic-genre novels do well” – Aerodrome reviews Marcus Low’s Asylum

Asylum
Barry James is detained in a quarantine facility in the blistering heat of the Great Karoo. Here he exists in two worlds: the discordant and unforgiving reality of his incarceration and the lyrical, snowy landscapes of his dreams.

He has cut all ties with his previous life, his health is failing, and he has given up all hope. All he has to cling to are the meanderings of his restless mind, the daily round of pills and the journals he reluctantly keeps as testimony to a life once lived.

And then there’s an opportunity to escape. But to escape what? And where to? Can there be a life to go back to? Is there still a world out there in the barren wasteland beyond the fence?

Gareth Langdon recently reviewed Low’s remarkable, unsettling debut novel for local online journal, Aerodrome:

Post apocalyptic motifs are overdone. Between The Walking Dead and The Hunger Games, contemporary media seems to scream the need for us all to be prepared for the worst – for the coming of the end. Whether or not this is a universal set of fears, or something unique to Hollywood is not much of a question.

What matters is that it is a tired trope, and that anyone hoping to tackle the genre is going to have an uphill battle.

Marcus Low makes light work of this challenge in his debut novel, Asylum.

The novel follows, through a series of eloquent and detailed journal entries, the plight of James Barry. Barry has been diagnosed with a fatal lung disease – likely tuberculosis – and finds himself incarcerated in a treatment facility or modern day sanitorium, in the middle of the Karoo.

His days drag on at a snail’s pace as he gazes out of the window at the dry bones of the earth, watching nothing happen, and writing regularly in his notebooks. He has made some friends though, and as inmates are want to do, they begin planning their escape. The novel traces Barry’s internal struggles as well as the planning and execution of their proposed escape.

Composed of notebook fragments and interjected with editor’s notes, written from what is ostensibly the point of view of whoever discovered the notebooks, the novel has an intensely personal feel.

Asylum is at once apocalyptic rendering, and psychological exploration.

Continue reading Langdon’s review here.

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Launch – Bantu Holomisa: The Game Changer by Eric Naki (21 November)

This autobiography looks at Bantu Holomisa and his journey into politics. As a son of a chief nothing less was expected of him than to go to school and get a university education. However he thought taking a gap year and starting a job in the post office would be great experience and make some money before going to university.

The book takes us through some life defining moments which lead to him joining the Defense Force, climbing up the ranks to being a respected Commander of the TDF. Alongside that we learn about the man who is generous and is known for helping his family, finding the love of his life and the family politics of being born to a royal family. Holomisa was a man who led with integrity and that is what carries him to being the Transkei leader. He has always had his own ways and not particularly leaning towards a political party or politics and that is what also leads to him being expelled from the ANC.

His expulsion stems from him wanting to always speak the truth and not letting others influence him otherwise. Due to numerous structures wanting him to still speak on their behalf he goes on to form the United Democratic Movement (UDM), which successfully gets elected into parliament a mere three years after his expulsion. He continues to be a thorn on the ANC’s side as an opposition in parliament.

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Celebrate the centenary of Oliver Tambo’s birth with this singular book

Oliver Reginald (OR) Tambo (27 October 1917 – 24 April 1993) was a veteran ANC strategist and highly respected leader of the organisation in exile. Tambo is also renown for promoting the reconciliation of white and black in South Africa.

Oliver Tambo Remembered is a salute to one of South Africa’s most remarkable individuals. Originally published in 2007, this compilation of memories is a celebration of what would have been Oliver Reginald Tambo’s 90th birthday. It sees friends and associates remembering OR the leader, the comrade and the man.

The contributions are written by people who encountered OR during his travels in Europe and the US, and who knew him whilst he was living in South Africa and in exile in Africa and the UK.

This edition of Oliver Tambo Remembered is published in commemoration of his centenary on 27 October 2017. The pieces in this book celebrate not only the impact that OR had on South Africa’s future, but also the character of a selfless, compassionate leader, who raised the international profile of the ANC through his wise and intelligent guidance, his humility and integrity, and his unyielding commitment to the struggle.

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Launch: The Blessed Girl by Angela Makholwa (2 November)


 

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