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Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Silent auction at Phumlani Pikoli’s Cape Town launch

A few ruined paintings to create the perfect example of creation through destruction.

Cape Town-based artist, Skubalisto, has created a painting which he describes as “the effect Phumlani Pikoli’s writing has on [his] creative process”.

The painting will be auctioned tomorrow at The Fatuous State of Severity launch in Cape Town. Join us at The Book Lounge, 5:30 for 6PM.

The Fatuous State of Severity is a fresh collection of short stories and illustrations that explores themes surrounding the experiences of a generation of young, urban South Africans coping with the tensions of social media, language insecurities and relationships of various kinds.

Intense and provocative, this new edition of the book, which was first self-published in 2016, features six additional stories as well as an introductory essay on Phumlani Pikoli’s publishing journey.

Phumlani Pikoli is a multi-media journalist and multi-skilled artist. He was born in Zimbabwe in 1988. This is his first time being published by an actual publishing house and he intends to write and publish many more books without restriction to form.

Book details


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Marcus Low’s Asylum shortlisted for the 2018 9mobile Prize for Literature


 
The 9mobile Prize for Literature recently announced their 2018 shortlist and local author Marcus Low’s remarkable debut novel, Asylum made the cut!

Previously known as the Etisalat Prize for Literature, the 9mobile Prize is the first ever pan-African prize celebrating first time writers of published fiction books.

The prize aims to serve as a platform for the discovery of new creative talent out of the continent and invariably promote the burgeoning publishing industry in Africa.
 

About Asylum:

 
Barry James is detained in a quarantine facility in the blistering heat of the Great Karoo.

Here he exists in two worlds: the discordant and unforgiving reality of his incarceration and the lyrical, snowy landscapes of his dreams.

He has cut all ties with his previous life, his health is failing, and he has given up all hope. All he has to cling to are the meanderings of his restless mind, the daily round of pills and the journals he reluctantly keeps as testimony to a life once lived.

And then there’s an opportunity to escape. But to escape what? And where to? Can there be a life to go back to? Is there still a world out there in the barren wasteland beyond the fence?

I was sitting in the train looking out at the falling snow. I knew then that I was not going home … I was going to an unknown place on a train full of unknown people.

And even though I knew I would not be coming back, that the factories that whooshed by were instantly hundreds of kilometres behind us, that the train would not deliver us anywhere where we’d want to be, I still felt grateful for the snow, the impossible snow.

For it seems to me that even in the most bleak of worlds we’ll find something to hold on to … even if that is something as impossible as snow in this god-forsaken wasteland.

Book details


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An inspiring account of the DPSC and how ordinary people came together to stand up against racism and the abuse of power

The Detainees’ Parents Support Committee (DPSC) was started in 1981 in Johannesburg, South Africa. It was set up by the parents, spouses and families of activists who were detained and had no recourse to legal intervention. Many in this movement had not been politically involved.

Members of the DPSC stood on the street corners with placards calling for the release of their children. They organised food, clothing and legal representation for detainees across the country, and they supported the detainees’ families. DPSC activists marched, petitioned, argued, wrote and protested for the release of all detainees. They made public the brutal operations of the security establishment.

The DPSC helped to draw international attention to the atrocities being perpetuated against children – some as young as nine – by the apartheid state. And the evidence amassed by the DPSC helped to lay some of the groundwork for South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC).

The Knock on the Door tells the story of the DPSC and of how the anti-detention movement became part of the mass uprising that brought down apartheid. It is an inspiring account of ordinary people coming together to stand up against racism and the abuse of power.

Terry Shakinovsky is a journalist who has been deployed across the world. She holds a postgraduate degree in History. A former student and United Democratic Front (UDF) activist who worked with the Detainees’ Parents Support Committee (DPSC), she is now the publications coordinator at the Mapungubwe Institute for Strategic Reflection in Johannesburg.

Sharon Cort holds degrees in English, Fine Arts and Psychology. In recent years, she has worked as a researcher, curator and writer for various museums and heritage sites, including Constitution Hill and Freedom Park. In 2011 she co-authored One Law, One Nation: The Making of the South African Constitution with Lauren Segal.

Lauren Segal holds postgraduate degrees in History and Film and Television Studies. She has written several books and is currently a director of an exhibition and design company, as well as a curator and heritage consultant. She and Sharon Cort have worked together on numerous projects, including co-authoring One Law, One Nation. She was the project manager and content editor on The Knock on the Door.

Book details

  • The Knock on the Door: The Story of The Detainees’ Parents Support Committee by Terry Shakinovsky, Sharon Cort
    EAN: 9781770105799
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

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Pan Macmillan accepting manuscript submissions from 20 – 24 November 2017

Pan Macmillan South Africa unfortunately does not accept unsolicited manuscripts.

We will only be accepting manuscripts during our open submissions period which will be from the 20th to the 24th of November 2017.

Guidelines for submitting your work to Pan Macmillan:

Pan Macmillan South Africa publishes books for the general market in the following categories:

General fiction

Literary fiction

Memoir/biography/autobiography

General non-fiction

Submission guidelines: Pan Macmillan South Africa


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Celebrate the centenary of Oliver Tambo’s birth with this singular book

Oliver Reginald (OR) Tambo (27 October 1917 – 24 April 1993) was a veteran ANC strategist and highly respected leader of the organisation in exile. Tambo is also renown for promoting the reconciliation of white and black in South Africa.

Oliver Tambo Remembered is a salute to one of South Africa’s most remarkable individuals. Originally published in 2007, this compilation of memories is a celebration of what would have been Oliver Reginald Tambo’s 90th birthday. It sees friends and associates remembering OR the leader, the comrade and the man.

The contributions are written by people who encountered OR during his travels in Europe and the US, and who knew him whilst he was living in South Africa and in exile in Africa and the UK.

This edition of Oliver Tambo Remembered is published in commemoration of his centenary on 27 October 2017. The pieces in this book celebrate not only the impact that OR had on South Africa’s future, but also the character of a selfless, compassionate leader, who raised the international profile of the ANC through his wise and intelligent guidance, his humility and integrity, and his unyielding commitment to the struggle.

Book details


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Listen to Angela Makholwa discuss her new novel over a light lunch (28 October)

Do you know what a blesser is? A yellow bone? Wie Sien Ons?


 
If you don’t (or even if you do), then come to listen to Angela Makholwa speaking on her fabulous novel, The Blessed Girl.

Bontle Tau is beautiful, street smart and ambitious who would not be seen in last year’s models: clothes or car. Her lifestyle is funded by her blessers: Chubby Papa Jeff (under scrutiny from the Hawks), Teddy with tender connections in Limpopo, and the gorgeous Mr. Emmanuel, the Nigerian businessman.

Part funny and frivolous (anal bleaching, Louboutin’s and Dr. Heinz’s beauty clinic on speed dial are a must!) and part tragedy, this is a book of the crazy new world where tenders are allocated to the pretty and well connected, where girls never pay for their own drinks at the swanky bars in exclusive hotels (or cars or butt implants ) and their blessers pay and pay…

But the cost is high as Bontle Tau finds out when her worlds of Mamelodi township (her mum Gladys is the shebeen queen and her brother is running with the wrong crowd) and Sandton penthouse collide.

A well-written and interesting read – part frothy fiction and part horror story. To my mind, this is a book of our time.

‘In The Blessed Girl, Angela Makholwa has yet again given us a deceptively simple yet layered narrative, in which the plot is as memorable as the characters are unforgettable. Bravo.’ – ZUKISWA WANNER

Details:

Date: Saturday, 28th October 2017
Time: 1pm for 1.30pm
Venue: 73 Tyrwhitt Avenue, Birdhaven
Light lunch and wine sponsored by Porcupine Ridge
No charge – buy a book!
RSVP: Pippa Smith on pippa@thebookrevue.co.za or Camilla Twigg on camillatwigg@mweb.co.za

The Blessed Girl
Book details


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Watch: Zelda la Grange on typing up Mandela’s manuscript

‘I have discovered the secret that after climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. I have taken a moment here to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can rest only for a moment, for with freedom comes responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not ended.’
NELSON MANDELA, Long Walk to Freedom

Dare Not Linger
In 1994, Nelson Mandela became the first president of a democratic South Africa. From the outset, he was committed to serving only a single five-year term. During his presidency, he and his government ensure that all South Africa’s citizens became equal before the law, and laid the foundations for turning a country riven by centuries of colonialism and apartheid into a fully functioning democracy.

Dare Not Linger is the story of Mandela’s presidential years, drawing heavily on the memoir he began to write as he prepared to finish his term of office but was unable to finish. Now, acclaimed South African writer Mandla Langa has completed the task, using Mandela’s unfinished draft, detailed notes that Mandela made as events were unfolding and a wealth of unseen archive material. With a prologue by Mandela’s widow, Graça Machel, the result is a vivid and often inspirational account of Mandela’s presidency and the creation of a new democracy. It tells the extraordinary story of a country in transition and the challenges Mandela faced as he strove to make his vision for a liberated South Africa a reality.

Nelson Mandela was born in Transkei, South Africa, on 18 July 1918. He joined the African National Congress in 1944 and was engaged in resistance against the ruling National Party’s apartheid policies for many years before being arrested in August 1962. Mandela was incarcerated for more than twenty-seven years, during which his reputation as a potent symbol of resistance to the anti-apartheid movement grew steadily. Released from prison in 1990, Mandela won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993 and was inaugurated as the first democratically elected president of South Africa in 1994. He is the author of the international bestseller Long Walk to Freedom. He died on 5 December 2013, at the age of ninety-five.

Mandla Langa was born in 1950 in Durban, South Africa. After being arrested in 1976, he went into exile and has lived in Botswana, Mozambique and Angola, where he did his Umkhonto weSizwe (the armed wing of the African National Congress) military training, as well as Hungary, Zambia and the United Kingdom, where he was the African National Congress’s cultural representative. A writer and journalist, he was the first South African to be awarded the Arts Council of Great Britain bursary for creative writing, and he has been a columnist for the Sunday Independent and the New Nation. In 2007, he was the recipient of the presidential Order of Ikhamanga in Silver for his literary and journalistic contribution to democracy in South Africa. He is also the author of several acclaimed novels, including The Lost Colours of the Chameleon, which won the 2009 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best Book in the African region.

Graça Machel was born in Gaza, Mozambique, in 1945. She was a member of the Mozambican Liberation Front (FRELIMO) which fought for and won independence from Portugal in 1975. A teacher, human rights activist, international advocate for women’s and children’s rights, and politician, she was – from 1975 until his death in 1986 – married to Samora Machel, the first president of Mozambique. She married Nelson Mandela on his eightieth birthday in July 1998. Among her numerous awards for her humanitarian work, she was a recipient of the United Nations’ Nansen Medal in 1995, and in 2007 she was made an honorary Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire.

Here Zelda la Grange, former personal assistant to Mandela, discusses the process of typing up the manuscript of Dare Not Linger:

Zelda la Grange_soundbite from Blackwell & Ruth on Vimeo.

Book details


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Watch: Verne Harris of the Nelson Mandela Foundation chats about the team who helped realise Dare Not Linger

‘I have discovered the secret that after climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. I have taken a moment here to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can rest only for a moment, for with freedom comes responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not ended.’
NELSON MANDELA, Long Walk to Freedom

In 1994, Nelson Mandela became the first president of a democratic South Africa. From the outset, he was committed to serving only a single five-year term. During his presidency, he and his government ensure that all South Africa’s citizens became equal before the law, and laid the foundations for turning a country riven by centuries of colonialism and apartheid into a fully functioning democracy.

Dare Not Linger is the story of Mandela’s presidential years, drawing heavily on the memoir he began to write as he prepared to finish his term of office but was unable to finish. Now, acclaimed South African writer Mandla Langa has completed the task, using Mandela’s unfinished draft, detailed notes that Mandela made as events were unfolding and a wealth of unseen archive material. With a prologue by Mandela’s widow, Graça Machel, the result is a vivid and often inspirational account of Mandela’s presidency and the creation of a new democracy. It tells the extraordinary story of a country in transition and the challenges Mandela faced as he strove to make his vision for a liberated South Africa a reality.

Nelson Mandela was born in Transkei, South Africa, on 18 July 1918. He joined the African National Congress in 1944 and was engaged in resistance against the ruling National Party’s apartheid policies for many years before being arrested in August 1962. Mandela was incarcerated for more than twenty-seven years, during which his reputation as a potent symbol of resistance to the anti-apartheid movement grew steadily. Released from prison in 1990, Mandela won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993 and was inaugurated as the first democratically elected president of South Africa in 1994. He is the author of the international bestseller Long Walk to Freedom. He died on 5 December 2013, at the age of ninety-five.

Mandla Langa was born in 1950 in Durban, South Africa. After being arrested in 1976, he went into exile and has lived in Botswana, Mozambique and Angola, where he did his Umkhonto weSizwe (the armed wing of the African National Congress) military training, as well as Hungary, Zambia and the United Kingdom, where he was the African National Congress’s cultural representative. A writer and journalist, he was the first South African to be awarded the Arts Council of Great Britain bursary for creative writing, and he has been a columnist for the Sunday Independent and the New Nation. In 2007, he was the recipient of the presidential Order of Ikhamanga in Silver for his literary and journalistic contribution to democracy in South Africa. He is also the author of several acclaimed novels, including The Lost Colours of the Chameleon, which won the 2009 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best Book in the African region.

Graça Machel was born in Gaza, Mozambique, in 1945. She was a member of the Mozambican Liberation Front (FRELIMO) which fought for and won independence from Portugal in 1975. A teacher, human rights activist, international advocate for women’s and children’s rights, and politician, she was – from 1975 until his death in 1986 – married to Samora Machel, the first president of Mozambique. She married Nelson Mandela on his eightieth birthday in July 1998. Among her numerous awards for her humanitarian work, she was a recipient of the United Nations’ Nansen Medal in 1995, and in 2007 she was made an honorary Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire.

Here Verne Harris, Director: Archive & Dialogue, Nelson Mandela Foundation, talks about the team who helped realise Dare Not Linger:

Verne Harris soundbite from Blackwell & Ruth on Vimeo.

 

Book details


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“She planted a different seed”: Sello Hatang on the role Graça Machel played in the completion of Dare Not Linger

Drawing on Nelson Mandela’s own unfinished memoir, Dare Not Linger is the remarkable story of his presidency told in his own words and those of distinguished South African writer Mandla Langa.

‘I have discovered the secret that after climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. I have taken a moment here to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can only rest for a moment, for with freedom comes responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not ended.’ Long Walk to Freedom

In 1994, Nelson Mandela became the first president of democratic South Africa. Five years later, he stood down. In that time, he and his government wrought the most extraordinary transformation, turning a nation riven by centuries of colonialism and apartheid into a fully functioning democracy in which all South Africa’s citizens, black and white, were equal before the law.

Dare Not Linger is the story of Mandela’s presidential years, drawing heavily on the memoir he began to write as he prepared to finish his term of office, but was unable to finish. Now, the acclaimed South African writer, Mandla Langa, has completed the task using Mandela’s unfinished draft, detailed notes that Mandela made as events were unfolding and a wealth of previously unseen archival material. With a prologue by Mandela’s widow, Graça Machel, the result is a vivid and inspirational account of Mandela’s presidency, a country in flux and the creation of a new democracy. It tells the extraordinary story of the transition from decades of apartheid rule and the challenges Mandela overcome to make a reality of his cherished vision for a liberated South Africa.

Here the CEO of the Nelson Mandela Foundation, Sello Hatang, discusses the significant impact Machel had on the completion of Dare Not Linger:

Sello Hatang soundbite 1 from Blackwell & Ruth on Vimeo.

 

Dare Not Linger

Book details


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Dare Not Linger: Mandla Langa’s vivid and inspirational account of Mandela’s presidency

Drawing on Nelson Mandela’s own unfinished memoir, Dare Not Linger is the remarkable story of his presidency told in his own words and those of distinguished South African writer Mandla Langa.

‘I have discovered the secret that after climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. I have taken a moment here to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can only rest for a moment, for with freedom comes responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not ended.’ Long Walk to Freedom

In 1994, Nelson Mandela became the first president of democratic South Africa. Five years later, he stood down. In that time, he and his government wrought the most extraordinary transformation, turning a nation riven by centuries of colonialism and apartheid into a fully functioning democracy in which all South Africa’s citizens, black and white, were equal before the law.

Dare Not Linger is the story of Mandela’s presidential years, drawing heavily on the memoir he began to write as he prepared to finish his term of office, but was unable to finish. Now, the acclaimed South African writer, Mandla Langa, has completed the task using Mandela’s unfinished draft, detailed notes that Mandela made as events were unfolding and a wealth of previously unseen archival material. With a prologue by Mandela’s widow, Graça Machel, the result is a vivid and inspirational account of Mandela’s presidency, a country in flux and the creation of a new democracy. It tells the extraordinary story of the transition from decades of apartheid rule and the challenges Mandela overcome to make a reality of his cherished vision for a liberated South Africa.

Dare Not Linger

Book details


» read article