Sunday Times Books LIVE Community Sign up

Login to Sunday Times Books LIVE

Forgotten password?

Forgotten your password?

Enter your username or email address and we'll send you reset instructions

Sunday Times Books LIVE

Pan Macmillan

@ Sunday Times Books LIVE

Archive for the ‘Competitions’ Category

Johan Broens’ The Wewelsburg Covenant Wins the 2009 Citizen Book Prize

Macmillan
The Citizen

The Citizen and Macmillan South Africa are proud to announce the winner of the Citizen Book Prize 2009 – the only book prize decided by the reading public.

The Wewelsburg Covenant by Johan Broens is a gripping World War 2-to-present-day account of one man’s conflict against his Nazi upbringing.

Swayed by an unintentional and undeniable love affair, James Trevellian’s choices will eventually decide the fate of the world.

There were almost 1 000 votes across all the titles in the final week, with The Wewelsburg Covenant receiving a record number of votes for this competition.

Macmillan have taken the decision to not publish the manuscript in its current form (a right detailed in the Prize conditions), but Johan Broens still receives a R10 000 cash prize and a writing course sponsored by Macmillan.

Broens looked back on the process he’s been through. “I wrote the novel, since it had been my ambition for nearly 10 years to do so. “I resigned my position at a consultancy to wholly spend my time devoted to the novel. I could not foresee any other way of writing it,” he says.

“I wrote on a fulltime basis, every day of the week, for four to eight hours per day, for seven weeks. Although I was confident of my writing abilities, I was even amazed at how readily the words flowed from my mind,” Broens says.

“Writing, to me, came naturally, most probably due to my passion for writing, my fertile imagination and very wide general knowledge. I have reached a stage in my life where I want to be creative. What could be more creative than writing a novel?” Broens says.

“It is my absolute ambition to be an author for the rest of my life.”

The Wewelsburg Covenant should find a large audience.

“My intended audience would be the same as those targeted through novels by authors such as Frederick Forsyth, Wilbur Smith, Tom Clancy, Harry Patterson, etc,” says Broens.

“The novel, I believe, would appeal to a wide variety of people, as it contains much intrigue and is closely associated with historical fact,” he says.

“Most importantly,“It is a novel which is believable. It has an authentic ring to it, making the reader believe that such events could have happened.

“It also, on a personal level, addresses an issue that many people face in today’s world, namely prejudice,” Broens says.

“And people generally enjoy reading books about secret organisations and novels that span over generations.”

Watch The Citizen‘s CitiVibe for a full interview with Johan Broens and more news about The Wewelsburg Covenant.


» read article

2009 Citizen Book Prize: Voting Closed!

Macmillan
The Citizen

The voting for the 2009 Citizen Book Prize has closed! Thanks to all who voted – we received huge numbers in the final week. We’re tallying the votes and will be in touch with the winner soon. Good luck to everyone who entered!


» read article

The Citizen Book Prize Final Poll: Vote for Your Favourite Synopsis

Macmillan
The Citizen

The voting for the 2009 Citizen Book Prize has almost come to an end. Now that you’ve seen all the synopses, here’s your chance to pick the winner! Please vote for your favourite synopsis using the poll below.

A recap of the eight eligible synopses (note that Living with My X by Stephen Semaj has been withdrawn from the competition):

Now make your “X” for your favourite synopsis!

Citizen Book Prize final poll


2009 Citizen Book Prize Final Poll – All Synopses(online surveys)


» read article

Citizen Book Prize Shortlist: The Year of Thrills and Chills by Reen Collett

Macmillan
The Citizen

THIS is the ninth of nine synopses of books eligible for the Citizen Book Prize.

The winner will be determined by readers’ votes. To help get your favourite manuscript published, vote and make your mark (see the voting box below the synopsis).

Voting for each synopsis will be open for the week following its publication in CitiVibe. If you miss that, you will be able to reread and vote for all nine synopses online from November 5 – 11.

Vote now! Tell your friends!

This is the only book prize for unpublished authors chosen by the reading public.

The Citizen Book Prize synopsis eight

The Year of Thrills and Chills

by Reen Collett

Part one

Jervis Marais, a 15-year-old farm boy from the Karoo who is at boarding school in Umbono, meets his uncle, James Marais, for the first time. James is an ex-SAS Colonel who is starting a career as a private investigator in KwaZulu-Natal.

Jervis invites his uncle to stay with him for the summer holidays to help solve a case involving the mysterious disappearance of the daughters of wealthy sugarcane farmer Geoff Orman.

Joining in the chase is another of Jervis’s uncles, Oom Baati! Kung, who is secretly a San Shaman; Blane King, a 16-year-old friend from school and devoted computer geek; and classmates Lesedi Maru-Butler and Marike Tshali. They pick up the trail of the kidnappers that leads to a secret cave in the Drakensberg and a “trance party” that goes seriously wrong.

Part Two

Lesedi relates a series of strange, paranormal events that happened to her and her brother Val, a student at Rhodes University, a few weeks back, involving the unpopular managers of a restaurant in Umbono, the Golden Hind.

Val’s friend Sid had tried to date Shireen, the beautiful daughter of the Asian owner of the restaurant, and was accosted by the manager, falling ill under mysterious circumstances. Lesedi experienced paranormal incidents involving the assistant manager and became infatuated with Shireen’s older brother, Siddharta, while Val was romantically involved with Shireen.

Lesedi was then abducted by a Nigerian gunman but classmate Kevin Dube and lawyer Leandros came to the rescue. When Sid’s and Val’s lives were threatened, Lesedi faced down the manager.

Meanwhile, during the autumn break, Jervis goes to the Bloemfontein Show and on his return writes an account of what happened there titled That Business of the Donkeys, submitting it for an English essay competition. Jervis had attended the show with the intention of buying Friesian geldings, but finds them beyond his means, and instead buys five donkeys to breed mules with.

But the so-called “King of Oranje” is also after the donkeys, and things heat up when the King’s agent turns up at Wolwehoek. Lesedi and Blane show up to help Jervis overcome “the donkey-napper”.

Jervis wins the essay competition.

Part Three

During the winter holidays, Jervis (now 16 years old), Blane and Sid go hiking in the Drakensberg. They meet Jervis’s Uncle James at a luxurious resort and encounter an intriguing, charismatic Indian businessman, Ramesh.

Jervis unexpectedly witnesses a drug-related murder, while Blane falls for an Eritrean girl. Ramesh gets mixed up with Sheba, the oldest daughter of Geoff Orman, who asks James for help.

Jervis and Sid are kidnapped at gunpoint but escape. A trail of clues is uncovered, pointing to identity fraud and drug dealing – from Flamingo Lagoon Resort to Chatsworth to an SAS-type beach bivouac and finally back to the Orman home itself.

The four help the police to solve the case, taking part in a dramatic martial arts battle that brings the events to a conclusion.

Vote for The Year of Thrills and Chills by Reen Collett


Citizen Book Prize Shortlist: The Year of Thrills and Chills by Reen Collett(surveys)


» read article

Citizen Book Prize Shortlist: Babette’s African Feast by Christy Mulco

Macmillan
The Citizen

THIS is the eighth of nine synopses of books eligible for the Citizen Book Prize.

The winner will be determined by readers’ votes. To help get your favourite manuscript published, vote and make your mark (see the voting box below the synopsis).

Voting for each synopsis will be open for the week following its publication in CitiVibe. If you miss that, you will be able to reread and vote for all nine synopses online from November 5 – 11.

Vote now! Tell your friends!

This is the only book prize for unpublished authors chosen by the reading public.

The Citizen Book Prize synopsis eight

Babette’s African Feast

by Christy Mulco

BABETTE is everywoman. One day she inexplicably comes to at the train station in Overberg, not knowing a soul, thrown upon the mercy of the station master Mr Wessels, and Steph Stephens, who works for him.

At first Babette helps Steph with housework but she soon finds a job with Dominee and Mev. Stander.

The community to which the Standers belong is a conservative group of country people who are trying to come to terms with the new South Africa. They are as drab as the gray and brown colours they wear.

Babette quietly works in and around the Standers’ lives. She loves cooking and experimenting with new ingredients.

Soon the Standers’ lives begin to “pinken up” as Babette adds spice to their lives.

Contrasted with this conservative group are the township people. Colourful, juicy, loud; they are somewhat unwieldy and are best described in technicolour, accompanied by loud music and vigorous dance. Babette impacts dynamically on both communities.

The story moves between Botriver, Hermanus and the township Zwelitshe.

In rural South Africa, as much as things change, they stay the same. Eventually Babette is able to bring the two groups together – a challenging and difficult thing to do.

The Standers and their friends come to enjoy more colourful lives and are amenable when Babette proposes a feast that will bring the two groups together in a collision of cultures that will change both groups forever.

But life has a surprise in store for Babette, who learns that she is HIV positive. Faced with adversity, she turns her fortunes around, using the news to effect joy in places of little hope.

She is confronted by the challenge of the potential devastation that Aids presents to her life and in the lives in the township; but she realises that one woman can make a difference.

This is a story about love, about the difference and sameness in people. It is a story of good luck and how someone, who is not willing to pursue materialistic ends and lose her soul in the process, can effect change in her very community.

Much of the story is told through the device of food. Babette works her magic through the palates and stomachs of her willing guinea pigs, using recipes from her childhood and culture.

She borrows from Western and northern Africa; she steals recipes from her friend Goya from Ghana. She invents delicious meals by using ingredients grown right outside her kitchen door. As the people open themselves to new foods, tastes and music, so too do they open up to Babette and the other cultures around them.

The conservative group warm up to their new lives. When Babette wins millions in the Lotto, the people of the township pull together to help her achieve her dream of using her good fortune to effect dramatic change in all of their lives.

This is a humorous story that gives some hope in a country overwhelmed by poverty and Aids. It is a story that builds on the tradition of Ubuntu and the love of communities.

Vote for Babette’s African Feast by Christy Mulco


Citizen Book Prize Shortlist: Babette’s African Christmas Feast by Christy Mulco(poll)


» read article

Citizen Book Prize Shortlist: Onion Tears by Shubnum Khan

Macmillan
The Citizen

THIS is the seventh of nine synopses of books eligible for the Citizen Book Prize.

The winner will be determined by readers’ votes. To help get your favourite manuscript published, vote and make your mark (see the voting box below the synopsis).

Voting for each synopsis will be open for the week following its publication in CitiVibe. If you miss that, you will be able to reread and vote for all nine synopses online from November 5 – 11.

Vote now! Tell your friends!

This is the only book prize for unpublished authors chosen by the reading public.

The Citizen Book Prize synopsis seven

Onion Tears

by Shubnum Khan

‘Listen my child. In life you’re either a ripe mango or a raw onion. Ripe mangoes are perfect; they’re sweet and juicy and everybody likes them. Raw onions? They’re good for nothing. Nobody wants to eat them. They have funny, funny ways and they don’t do nothing right. Now tell me; you want to be a ripe mango or a raw onion? Of course you want to be a ripe mango. Everybody wants to be a ripe mango.’

Onion Tears is a tale of three generations of Indian Muslim women living in suburban South Africa. Khadeejah Bibi Ballim is a stubborn, hardworking, first-generation Indian who hates rice in her carpet. She longs for her beloved India and often questions what she is doing on the tip of Africa. She detests her daughter, adores her granddaughter and, after her husband’s failed coconut lamp experiment, sells pickles from her small house to make a living.

Her daughter Summaya is a morose thirty-seven year old struggling to reconcile her South African and Indian identities. Summaya works at a small travel agency, struggles to be a good mother and fiercely guards a secret from her past.

Her daughter, Aneesa is eleven years old. Stuck-in-the-middle-age, she is considered neither adult nor child. Her precocious nature leads her to believe that her mother is lying about her father, believing him not to be dead, which prompts her to undertake her own quest to discover the truth.

Pieces of each character’s past forge together to explain the present. Khadeejah’s history growing up as a child in the 60s in Bronkhorstspruit and later as a young wife to an unstable husband is revealed through intermittent flashbacks.

Summaya’s past as a headstrong girl and then loving young wife provides insights about the changes that she undergoes to eventually become her disappointed self. Summaya’s secret is gradually revealed while Aneesa makes her own startling discoveries.

Onion Tears intimately explores identity through the secrets that people keep; the words they swallow and the emotions they mute. Every person suffers something in their life and the novel asks: how much does a person change when faced with adversity? It concerns a young girl’s search for her father, but this is entwined with stories of how apartheid affected society, conflict of identity and tragedy which, never far off, is what eventually will either bring the family together or tear it apart.

Vote for Onion Tears by Shubnum Khan


Citizen Book Prize Shortlist: Onion Tears by Shubnum Khan(answers)


» read article

Citizen Book Prize Shortlist: Mrs T and the Rex by Domenico Pisanti

Macmillan
The Citizen

THIS is the sixth of nine synopses of books eligible for the Citizen Book Prize.

The winner will be determined by readers’ votes. To help get your favourite manuscript published, vote and make your mark (see the voting box below the synopsis).

Voting for each synopsis will be open for the week following its publication in CitiVibe. If you miss that, you will be able to reread and vote for all nine synopses online from November 5 – 11.

Vote now! Tell your friends!

This is the only book prize for unpublished authors chosen by the reading public.

The Citizen Book Prize synopsis six

‘We stared into the mystery and it stared straight back at us.’

Mrs Taljaard has been living with a secret for well over 60 years – a secret about something that happened to her in 1944. Now in her eighties, Corrie Taljaard (or ‘Mrs T’ as she was known back then) finally commits to paper all that happened that fateful summer in ’44.

Set in idyllic Parktown, Johannesburg, Mrs T writes about a group of friends she called her ‘knitting circle’ (for that is what most women did while they waited for word from or about their men fighting the war – they knitted – or at least congregated to pretend to).

‘I suppose looking back, what we did was cope. Cope with the waiting,’ writes Mrs T.

But for some, waiting isn’t enough, and soon Mrs T and her friends find themselves in their own battle; they enter a strange world of intrigue in which they must fight for survival in a world filled with avarice.

Meanwhile, something strange is afoot in the quiet suburb … something that makes the ground shake late at night; as if the bombs and the guns of war in far-off North Africa are visiting the otherwise-peaceful suburb.

What Mrs T and her friends discover up on the hill sucks them into a mysterious adventure involving man’s endless quest to seek out the ultimate weapon, resulting in the age-old battle of one mother trying to protect her child. They soon discover that not all wonder and mystery has drained from the world, and that not all monsters have teeth – in fact, they sometimes look just like you and me.

Mrs T and the Rex is part urban myth, part friendship drama, and part World War II-story. It shows that war, no matter where it is fought in the world, affects everybody. Not only the men fighting on the front lines, but also the women who wait anxiously for news at home. The women of Mrs T’s knitting circle find themselves on the edge of their very own front line, fighting an enemy that is both villain and victim; a far-worse danger to all than ‘old Jerry’.

Mrs T’s Parktown enemy represents the ambiguity and moral dilemma of war: just because one is in opposition to someone else, does it mean that you’re right and the opposition is wrong? It forces the reader to understand both perspectives and unwittingly (and perhaps unwillingly) accept that sometimes there is no such thing as ‘sides’.

Told with an honest voice, and a certain innocence, Mrs Taljaard’s story recalls time spent with her close friends, the prevailing loss of life and … the secret up on the hill.

‘You may not believe me, but I’ve come to terms with that a long time ago. Stories aren’t always there to be believed. Just to be told.’

Vote for Mrs T and the Rex by Domenico Pisanti


Citizen Book Prize Shortlist: Mrs T and the Rex by Domenico Pisanti(polling)


» read article

Citizen Book Prize Shortlist: Bad Blood by Amanda Coetzee

Macmillan
The Citizen

THIS is the fifth of nine synopses of books eligible for the Citizen Book Prize.

The winner will be determined by readers’ votes. To help get your favourite manuscript published, vote and make your mark (see the voting box below the synopsis).

Voting for each synopsis will be open for the week following its publication in CitiVibe. If you miss that, you will be able to reread and vote for all nine synopses online from November 5 – 11.

Vote now! Tell your friends!

This is the only book prize for unpublished authors chosen by the reading public.

The Citizen Book Prize synopsis five

Bad Blood

by Amanda Coetzee

TO find a missing child, a detective must return to the past that he is running from. The police know the date and they know the victim, but can they find him in time?

An eight-year-old boy abandoned by his mother at a fairground is raised by a clan of Irish travellers as one of their own. Given the name Harry, as in “any Tom, Dick or Harry”, he carves out a reputation as a formidable bare-knuckle boxer.

Fists always at the ready, matched by an unremitting refusal to back down, he is given the clan name “Badger”.

Eight years on, Badger is angry, dangerous and ready to make his own way in the world.

He is convinced that he is of “bad blood” – he doesn’t know who or where his birth parents are and cannot imagine why his mother abandoned him.

He secretly believes there is something wrong with him that explains his having been abandoned by her.

Severing all ties with his clan, Badger wanders for several years before, in a final act of rebellion, he applies and is surprisingly accepted to the London Metropolitan Police Force.

He soon finds his niche as an undercover police operative, slowly losing himself in each new role, blending in everywhere, yet belonging nowhere. In spite of his abrasiveness and reclusive nature, Harry is promoted to Detective Inspector of the Drug Squad at New Scotland Yard. He is respected for his loyalty and tenacity, though his unconventional methods make him an unlikely candidate for further promotion. He begins to believe that he has left Badger behind forever, until a traveller child is snatched from an informal settlement in Bedford.

Suspicious of all authority, the local clan refuses to co-operate with the police, taking matters into their own hands. Now desperate to establish a connection with the traveller community and with time running out, Harry is unwillingly sent by his superiors straight back to his past.

Troubled and disoriented, Harry tries to honour his role as a police officer, but in order for the community to accept him, he is forced to shed much of his new persona. In order to keep working the investigation from within the community, he strikes up a tentative partnership with an idealistic social services liaison officer, Emily Meadows.

Together they find themselves distrusted by both the police and the clan. While conducting their own investigation, Emily uncovers a series of startlingly similar child abductions and horrific murders stretching back to August 1985.

Each child is taken precisely eight years apart; they are all eight years old and bear an uncanny physical resemblance to one another. Mikey, the missing boy, is the fourth child in the string of abductions.

Harry and Emily quickly realise that they have less than 24 hours to find him before he too is brutally murdered.

Together, Harry and Emily race to save the missing boy, uncovering a trail that leads right back to the day Harry was abandoned at Brighton Fairground and a final shocking family secret that threatens to destroy them all.

Vote for Bad Blood by Amanda Coetzee


Citizen Book Prize Shortlist: Bad Blood by Amanda Coetzee(survey software)


» read article

The Citizen Book Prize Shortlist: The Wewelsburg Covenant by Johan Broens

Macmillan
The Citizen

THIS is the fourth of nine synopses of books eligible for the Citizen Book Prize.

The winner will be determined by readers’ votes. To help get your favourite manuscript published, vote and make your mark (see the voting box below the synopsis).

Voting for each synopsis will be open for the week following its publication in CitiVibe. If you miss that, you will be able to reread and vote for all nine synopses online from November 5 – 11.

Vote now! Tell your friends!

This is the only book prize for unpublished authors chosen by the reading public.

The Citizen Book Prize synopsis Four

The Wewelsburg Covenant

by Johan Broens

IN 1944, fearing that Germany will lose World War II, Hitler and Himmler hatch a devious plot to ensure the continuation of the Nazi cause: the persecution of Jewish People. A secret organisation, OSSFOW (Organisation SS für Operation Wewelsburg), is created for this purpose.

The plot unravels from the Renaissance-era Wewelsburg Castle in central Germany, ritual headquarters of the SS and Himmler’s Camelot, where twelve “knights”, fashioned on the Arthurian concept, declare an oath of allegiance to the Nazi cause.

A major front corporation for OSSFOW, Trevellian Enterprises, is set up in Argentina using treasure looted during the war and deposited into Swiss bank accounts. Offspring of select fanatical SS men and women and high-ranking Nazi members with pure Aryan lineage are raised in secret on a farm in Argentina, conceived through artificial insemination.

One of these children, James Trevellian, the genetic son of Adolf Hitler, is raised and groomed by his surrogate father, an SS general, to take over the reins of the organisation upon the general’s death.

In 1956 Trevellian Enterprises expands its operations to Britain, assisted by the use of blackmail against high-ranking members of the British establishment; powerful elites that collaborated and sympathised with the Nazis during the war.

OSSFOW retains documentary proof of their collaboration and uses this, together with its vast fortune, to expand globally.

New generations of Nazi offspring, from the 1950s to 2011, operate behind the scenes to realise the aim of destroying the Israeli state; encouraging Israel’s Islamic neighbours to rise against it.

Actual global events of the last five decades are woven into the story.

OSSFOW’s young members are sent to exclusive schools and universities to create a pool of highly trained experts. Using this expertise, and bolstered by the disintegration of the Soviet Union, the organisation manufactures nuclear weapons for use against Israel.

These events lead up to the near future, with the American withdrawal from Iraq leading to civil war and total anarchy; inspiring an Islamic coup in Egypt.

Trevellian is on the brink of realising his life’s ambition; the destruction of the state of Israel. For deceptive and cunning reasons, he intentionally befriends Jewish people, but incongruously falls in love with Elizabeth Rosen, a Jewish woman. Trevellian experiences inner turmoil conflicting with his intrinsic beliefs.

He decides to sacrifice love for the cause, and he severs all ties with Elizabeth, simultaneously divorcing his wife due to her inability to produce an heir. A chance encounter with Elizabeth nine years later rekindles suppressed feelings. It is also the organisation’s most opportune moment to destroy Israel through nuclear attack.

It is the year 2011. The fate of the world is in the hands of James Trevellian. Will the evil physical seed inherited from Hitler triumph within Trevellian? Will Trevellian experience an epiphany, induced by love, and embark on an irrevocable journey of redemption? Or will history repeat itself, resulting in human misery and global mayhem? Will Elizabeth Rosen, unbeknownst to her, augment Trevellian’s evil actions, or will love conquer all?

The order is issued. Trevellian has decided…

Vote for The Wewelsburg Covenant by Johan Broens


Citizen Book Prize Shortlist: The Wewelsburg Covenant by Johan Broens(trends)


» read article

The Citizen Book Prize Shortlist: Opening The Knot by Etienne L Smit

Macmillan
The Citizen

THIS is the third of nine synopses of books eligible for the Citizen Book Prize.

The winner will be determined by readers’ votes. To help get your favourite manuscript published, vote and make your mark (see the voting box below the synopsis).

Voting for each synopsis will be open for the week following its publication in CitiVibe. If you miss that, you will be able to reread and vote for all nine synopses online from November 5 – 11.

Vote now! Tell your friends!

This is the only book prize for unpublished authors chosen by the reading public.

The Citizen Book Prize synopsis Three

Opening The Knot

by Etienne L Smit

HE’S alive and lives among us, but nobody knows…

This is the true story of the events leading up to an astounding discovery.

To celebrate the acquisition of my new farm I invited some friends to the long-abandoned property.

That night, for the first time in my life, I experienced absolute terror; in the midst of nightmarish screaming I walked straight into a very tall, furry humanoid “thing” with little red pinprick eyes that glowed in the dark.

Pursuing a somewhat haphazard path I hoped would lead me to greater spiritual awareness, I moved into the house in the valley – my one man monastery. My first visitor, Dorkas, who wore red and white beads on her wrists, informed me that the place was cursed.

Shortly afterwards, the beautiful Isabella arrived to stay, in between photographic assignments.

After Isabella’s departure for Iraq, I was blinded by an Egyptian cobra that sprayed venom into my eyes.

I was airlifted to a hospital in Pretoria, but the quantity of venom wasn’t very great, although I had a near-death experience. Fortunately, the medics managed to revive me.

Chaos was unleashed as things started to go horribly wrong on the farm. When the two rondavels burned to the ground, we found three little bottles containing a mysterious black substance in the remains of a wall.

Dorkas urged me to consult with Wiseman, her teacher; he could help, she said. In spite of my scepticism, we went to see him. According to Wiseman, the farm was sacred to the “Ancestors”, and I shouldn’t have lived there. He told me that the furry humanoid was my ally, and would show me things that ordinary men couldn’t see.

The bones were thrown and he foretold that I would undertake a journey – literal as well as metaphorical. The Ancestors had decreed that I should be initiated as a sangoma.

Dorkas was appointed as my teacher and the Ancestors would teach me through my dreams.

Initiation propelled me into a magical world of unparalleled mystery and grandeur – a world of dreams, visions, transformational symbols, spirit guides, gatekeepers and esoteric knowledge that lead me to ever-increasing consciousness.

I developed astonishing powers.

I then accompanied Isabella on assignment to India, where I met an elderly gentleman who that had appeared to me in a vision while still in South Africa.

Our relationship finally foundered; Isabella returned to London, and I to the farm. On returning, try as I may, I was unable to continue with my former life as a sangoma.

I searched for Dorkas, but couldn’t find her.

The subsequent death of my only friend left me totally alone and the void became unbearable, leading to a dark night of the soul. As I hit rock bottom, I found a stone with what appeared to be a cross in a circle on it; mankind’s oldest and most-revered symbol, depicting the union of heaven and Earth.

I now entered the spiritual realm of the mystic. The elderly man of my visions was revealed to be the Saint whose Second Coming has long been predicted.

* * *

Vote for Opening the Knot by Etienne L Smit


The Citizen Book Prize: Opening the Knot by Etienne L Smit(online surveys)


» read article